What would right relationship among the Native and non-Native peoples of this continent look like? How can we begin to take steps in that direction in our communities, places of worship, schools, and other institutions?
The Toward Right Relationship with Native Peoples (TRR) initiative promotes education, reflection, dialogue, and action in response to these queries. 

Our goal

is to build relationships among Native and non-Native communities, based on truth, respect, justice and our shared humanity.

Join us as we learn with each other, challenge, and support each other in this peace-building work that addresses more than 500 years of genocide, colonization, and forced assimilation of Native peoples.

The Toward Right Relationship with Native Peoples initiative offers:
  • Public presentations at the request of faith communities, schools, universities, and civic organizations throughout the United States.
  • Outreach to citizen groups
  • Indian Boarding School Research

Presentations

The Toward Right Relationship with Native Peoples initiative offers public presentations at the request of faith communities, schools, universities, and civic organizations throughout the United States. To request these presentations, please contact Paula Palmer.

We offer this 2-hour workshop in response to calls from Indigenous leaders at the United Nations and the World Council of Churches.Through an experiential exercise, we trace the historic and ongoing impacts of the Doctrine of Discovery, the 15th-century justification for European subjugation of non-Christian peoples. Our goal is to raise our level of knowledge and concern about these impacts, recognize them in ourselves and our institutions, and explore how we can begin to take actions toward right relationship. In the Doctrine of Discovery we find the roots of injustice. In the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, we find the seeds of change. How can we nurture these seeds to bring forth the fruits of right relationship among Native and non-Native peoples? 

Download and circulate a flyer  

Through this 1-hour program, 6-12 grade students symbolically experience the colonization of North America as the Native peoples and the European colonists experienced it. They hear the voices of Indigenous leaders, and European popes, monarchs, presidents, generals, and historians as the story unfolds. The exercise is followed by a response period, when students share what they learned, how they feel, and what they think about the reality of Native peoples in our society today. Supplementary materials for teachers are provided.

Download and circulate a flyer

This 1-hour documentary film tells the story of a rural community in Washington state that undertook some significant actions toward reconciliation with the area’s Indigenous peoples. Following the film, a facilitated discussion will focus on your community: Who are the Native peoples who have lived and are now living on the land that you call home? How can you learn your region’s real history? What would right relationship with Native peoples look like in your community? What steps can you start taking in that direction?

Download and circulate a flyer

Native American organizations are asking churches to join in a Truth and Reconciliation process to bring about healing for Native American families that continue to suffer the consequences of the Indian boarding schools. With support from Pendle Hill (the Cadbury scholarship), Friends Historical Library (the Moore Fellowship), the Native American Rights Fund, and other Friendly sources, Paula Palmer researched the role that Quakers played in implementing the federal government’s policy of forced assimilation of Native children. This 1-hour slide presentation is followed by an hour of discussion about what this history means for Friends and Native Americans today.

Download and circulate a flyer

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PResentations

We offer this 2-hour workshop in response to calls from Indigenous leaders at the United Nations and the World Council of Churches.Through an experiential exercise, we trace the historic and ongoing impacts of the Doctrine of Discovery, the 15th-century justification for European subjugation of non-Christian peoples. Our goal is to raise our level of knowledge and concern about these impacts, recognize them in ourselves and our institutions, and explore how we can begin to take actions toward right relationship. In the Doctrine of Discovery we find the roots of injustice. In the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, we find the seeds of change. How can we nurture these seeds to bring forth the fruits of right relationship among Native and non-Native peoples? 

Download and circulate a flyer  

Through this 1-hour program, 6-12 grade students symbolically experience the colonization of North America as the Native peoples and the European colonists experienced it. They hear the voices of Indigenous leaders, and European popes, monarchs, presidents, generals, and historians as the story unfolds. The exercise is followed by a response period, when students share what they learned, how they feel, and what they think about the reality of Native peoples in our society today. Supplementary materials for teachers are provided.

Download and circulate a flyer

This 1-hour documentary film tells the story of a rural community in Washington state that undertook some significant actions toward reconciliation with the area’s Indigenous peoples. Following the film, a facilitated discussion will focus on your community: Who are the Native peoples who have lived and are now living on the land that you call home? How can you learn your region’s real history? What would right relationship with Native peoples look like in your community? What steps can you start taking in that direction?

Download and circulate a flyer

Native American organizations are asking churches to join in a Truth and Reconciliation process to bring about healing for Native American families that continue to suffer the consequences of the Indian boarding schools. With support from Pendle Hill (the Cadbury scholarship), Friends Historical Library (the Moore Fellowship), the Native American Rights Fund, and other Friendly sources, Paula Palmer researched the role that Quakers played in implementing the federal government’s policy of forced assimilation of Native children. This 1-hour slide presentation is followed by an hour of discussion about what this history means for Friends and Native Americans today.

Download and circulate a flyer

Your Content Goes Here

Resources

Who We Are

Paula Palmer, a Quaker peace worker, and Jerilyn DeCoteau, an Ojibwe attorney and educator, began doing this work together in 2013. They offer workshops and other public programs, and have trained more than 100 additional Native and non-Native volunteers who facilitate these programs in various parts of the United States.

Recent news from our workshops